Making Urine Cultures Great Again

As this blog covered earlier this month, the diagnosis of urinary tract infection – as common and pervasive as it might be – is still fraught with diagnostic uncertainty and inconclusive likelihood ratios. In practice, clinicians combine pretest likelihood, subjective symptoms, and the urinalysis to make a decision regarding treatment – and invariably err on the side of over-treatment.

This is an interesting study taking place in the Nationwide Children’s Hospital network regarding their use of urine cultures. In retrospect, these authors noted only half of patients initially diagnosed with UTI had the diagnosis ultimately confirmed by contemporaneous urine culture. Their intervention, then, in order to reduce harm from adverse effects of antibiotics, was to contact patients following a negative urine culture result and request antibiotics be stopped.

This tied into an entire quality-improvement procedure simply to use the electronic health record to accurately follow-up the urine cultures, but over the course of the intervention, 910 patients met inclusion criteria. These patients were prescribed a total of 8,648 days of antibiotics, and the intervention obviated 3,429 (40%) of those days. Owing to increasing uptake of the study intervention by clinicians, the rate of antibiotic obviation had reached 61% by the end of the study period.

There are some obvious flaws in this sort of retrospective reporting on a QI intervention, as there was no reliable follow-up of patients included. The authors report no patients were subsequently diagnosed with a UTI within 14 days of being contacted, but this is based on only 46 patients who subsequently sought care within their healthcare system within 14 days, and not any comprehensive follow-up contact. There is no verification or antibiotics actually being discontinued following contact. Then, finally, antibiotic-free days are only a surrogate for a reduction the suspected adverse events associated with their administration.

All that said, this probably represents reasonable practice. Considering the immense frequency with which urine cultures are sent and antibiotics prescribed for dysuria, the magnitude of effect witnessed here suggests a potentially huge decrease in exposure to unnecessary antibiotics.

“Urine Culture Follow-up and Antimicrobial Stewardship in a Pediatric Urgent Care Network”
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2017/03/14/peds.2016-2103

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