Neither Benefit Nor Harm Seen With Oxygen in Myocardial Infarction

We’ve been hanging on to the biological hypothesis of treating ischemia with supplemental oxygen for quite some time – despite some evidence to the contrary with regard to damage from oxygen free radical formation. What’s needed is a large, randomized trial – and so we have DETOX2-AMI, run through the SWEDEHEART trial registry.

This trial randomized individual patients with suspected or known myocardial infarction to continuous oxygen therapy or ambient air.  Patients were excluded from enrollment if they had oxygen saturation below 90% at baseline, or were not Swedish national citizens as necessary for long-term follow-up. These patients actually received fairly vigorous oxygen therapy, far exceeding the typical nasal cannula oxygen we see on patients arriving via EMS – patients randomized to the oxygen arm received 6 liters per minute via face mask for 6 to 12 hours.

Over the 1.5 year trial period, these authors enrolled 6,629 patients, generally evenly matched with regard to baseline clinical characteristics, and 75% of whom ultimately had a final diagnosis of myocardial infarction.  Detailed outcomes, owing to the underlying registry infrastructure, are scant – as compared to the AVOID trial, in which many patients underwent cardiac MRI to evaluate infarct size and ejection fraction. What you get are the hard outcomes: death and rehospitalization with myocardial infarction – and there is no difference, both in the short- or long-term, and in both the intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses. The authors also include median highest troponin T as a surrogate for infarct severity and morbidity, and there is no difference there, either.

The underlying hypothesis here was to demonstrate a beneficial effect to oxygen in myocardial infarction – defined as a clinically relevant effect size of 20% lower relative risk of death – and that threshold was clearly not met.  There are some small differences with regard to oxygen delivery, as compared to AVOID, with the AVOID trial delivering oxygen at a much higher concentration.  But, effectively, the takeaway from these data is: oxygen just probably doesn’t matter enough to be clinically relevant. There’s no reason to be condescending and militant about taking the oxygen off a patient with myocardial infarction, and likewise it’s reasonable to consider it a wasteful intervention with regard to canistered oxygen supply.

Finally, just for fun, to recap the anachronistic acronym MONA:

Morphine – Possible small harms, as relating to inhibition of antiplatelet agents.
Oxygen – Almost certainly irrelevant with regard to clinical outcomes.
Nitroglycerin – Likely irrelevant with regard to clinical outcomes.
Aspirin – Still good!

“Oxygen Therapy in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction”
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1706222

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